Photo by David Lienhard on Flickr

Editorial by Rick Remmers

The Advent celebration is synonymous with lights. They decorate our neighborhoods, malls, trees and homes. When we look in the gospel accounts of the first advent of Jesus, we find the angels appearing to the shepherds with a brilliant light. Their presence or message could not be missed—Christ had come.

Then there was the star from the east leading wise men to the humble dwelling to see Jesus. The light of the star provided a guide for those who were willing to find the One who would light the world.

Blog by Rob Vandeman

We love to read the Psalms and rightly so. While Psalms may be the most popular book of the Bible, the Psalms are often the most misunderstood and misinterpreted. Many of us choose a few favorites and ignore others that strike us as bizarre or even cruel. Yet all the psalms were written for our benefit. To understand and appreciate the whole collection, we need solid principles of interpretation that will guide us to a proper reading and application of this riveting part of God’s Word.

There are several principles that we should keep in mind as we read the psalms. Not only will they help us understand God’s message in the psalms, but the principles will also allow us to see them in all their richness. As we meditate on the psalms we think, feel, imagine and choose in increasingly godly ways.

In order to illustrate each of these principles, we will apply them to Psalm 131:

    A song for the ascent to Jerusalem    A psalm of David

    1. My heart is not proud, O Lord,
    my eyes are not haughty;
    I do not concern myself with great matters
    or things too wonderful for me.

    2. But I have stilled and quieted my soul;
    like a weaned child with its mother,
    like a weaned child is my soul within me.

Durante la reunión de fin de año de la Unión de Columbia, los miembros del Comité Ejecutivo analizaron el documento sobre la Unidad en la Misión votado a principios de octubre por el Consejo Anual de la Asociación General. Muchos expresaron su preocupación por la intención, el propósito, las suposiciones que implica el documento, y cómo impactará la misión de la iglesia en esta región.

Dave Richmond, un miembro de la Asociación de Pennsylvania dijo que el documento desdibuja las líneas entre las creencias fundamentales y las pólizas. “Da la impresión que nuestras pólizas están al mismo nivel de nuestras creencias fundamentales”.

Story by Heidi Whetmore

As Spencerville Adventist Academy (SAA) sophomore Autumn Uhrig watched a YouTube video one morning, something piqued her interest. Millions of people who can’t speak rely on text-to-speech devices to communicate. Most devices have the same vocal sound for all users, regardless of age or gender. Uhrig learned of VocaliD, which, according to their website, is “the human voicebank of the world.”

VocaliD records human voices, mixes them with sounds a non-speaking person can make and blends them to make a unique humanized voice in which the machine talks for them. Uhrig wanted to do her part in helping someone find their voice. She visited the website, recorded a couple of sentences and waited to see if there was anyone her age who needed assistance. Months later she received an email that a young girl, Tesa, was a good match for her voice. Uhrig now needed to record 3,488 sentences to get the job done.

 Adventist HealthCare

Story by WAH Staff

Hospital and community leaders, caregivers and partners of Adventist HealthCare gathered on Dec. 2 for a blessing ceremony just ahead of the pouring of the foundation for the new Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital in the White Oak area of Maryland, set to open in 2019.

The ceremony, opened by Erik Wangsness, president of Adventist HealthCare Washington Adventist Hospital, celebrated not only the physical foundation pouring, but also recognized Adventist HealthCare’s foundation built upon the longstanding legacy of Adventists bringing holistic, whole-person healing to their communities.

Story by WAU Communication staff

The Washington Adventist University (WAU) Chapter of Enactus launched a new project, “First Step, a Women Empowerment Project,” on Wednesday, December 7 at a 9 a.m. meeting, held at the Bedford Station Apartments, 1400 University Blvd., E., Hyattsville, Maryland.

The project will seek sustainable work and career opportunities for women and families in the Langley Park area. The goal of the project is to empower women by providing them with the skills and support needed to find a job and enter the workforce.

 Leaving the past behind and moving to a new life

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

Diego Boquer, pastor of Chesapeake Conference’s Living Word church in Glen Burnie, Md., recently wrote “Journey to Freedom: Leaving the past behind and moving to a new life,” a 40-day devotional on the book of Exodus. He’s encouraging his church family to start 2017 by studying the Bible in companion with his book in preparation for a year of evangelism.

Story originally published on by Mark Kellner/ Photo by Gage Skidmore

Dr. Benjamin S. Carson, Sr., a prominent pediatric neurosurgeon and Seventh-day Adventist who was the first member of the denomination to seek the U.S. presidential nomination has accepted an offer extended by President-elect Donald J. Trump to become Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, commonly known as HUD, a federal agency which spends $48 billion a year.

Story by Fylvia Fowler Kline

Hope Channel Deaf ( joins Hope Channel’s global network this week as an Internet-based media ministry with four categories of programs—Nature Family, Bible, and Health.

Programs on Hope Channel Deaf are signed or captioned in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French and German. Larry Evans, Manager, Hope Channel Deaf, notes that this is “a historical mark in the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s ministry.” He says, “It is clearly the providence of God that has opened so many doors to reach out to this marginalized and unreached people group.”