This Month's Issue

Historia de Edwin Manuel Garcia / Photos por Toril Lavender

La Asociación de Mountain View hace frente al crecimiento inesperado de la población hispana en los pueblos rurales de West Virginia solicitando la ayuda misionera de un grupo sudamericano de cracks del fútbol. 

Un mensaje grabado en el contestador automático de una pequeña iglesia de Moorefield, West Virginia, era incomprensible para sus miembros. Sin embargo, nadie lo quería borrar por si alguien, algún día, podría comprenderlo. El mensaje estaba en español, un idioma que hace diez años era poco conocido en la región de los Apalaches.

by Benjamin Benson on Flickr

Story by Kimberly Luste Maran

Want to make your church a comfort care center to help community members in extreme weather conditions?

Required Criteria

• Heating and cooling systems maintaining minimum temperature of 68°F during fall and winter and 72°F during spring and summer months

• NOT enrolled in the "voluntary black out" program offered by electric utility providers

• Accessible to people with disabilities/ADA-compliant

• Ample seating appropriate to your community

• Public restrooms accessible to people with disabilities

Story by Kimberly Luste Maran and Beth Michaels

In the United States on a single night in January 2014, 578,424 people experienced homelessness—they were sleeping outside, or in an emergency shelter or transitional housing program.1 In 2014, 46.7 million people lived in poverty.2

The numbers are striking, but when the impact of extreme weather conditions on these particular populations are factored in, the number of people needing assistance can be staggering. Add to this people who are economically secure but have experienced an extreme weather event and are temporarily yet suddenly thrust out of their safe, stable environment.

Here are ways Seventh-day Adventist churches and members can, and are, helping:

Crafting a Cold Weather Refuge

Noreen Chan Tompkins

Story by Elena Cornwell / Photos by Daniel Shanken, Andrew Rush and Joshua Roberts/AP Photos

Three members share how they represent the Lord to the world around them—all while they shine in divinely appointed career paths.

Terry Hess: Spicing Up Life

Hess’ goal was to be the vice president of his bank, One Valley Bank (now BB&T), before he was 30. He succeeded. In 1997 his uncle called to inform Hess it was time to buy his Virginia Honey Company, which he did later that year. Hess committed to give five cents of whatever sold to charity. Under his leadership, the company donated $1.5 million and grew four times. That was just the beginning of God’s path for Hess.