New Jersey Conference

Photo of Tony Liriano by Jorge Pilco

Story by V. Michelle Bernard / Photos by Jorge Pillco

For years Tony Liriano had the dream of starting and leading a new church. Tony and his wife, Maria, were excited for the opportunity to plant a church and spread the gospel in Garfield, N.J. Since starting the project more than a year ago, Tony, who leads the New Jersey Conference church plant as a lay pastor, reports a membership growth from 10 to 60 people. Members faithfully invite friends to attend, gather for a weekly prayer session and help to reach those who don’t know Jesus. A family of six started attending the church after Tony greeted them on the street and invited them to attend. Maria says the key to their growth is the family environment and members who “act like Jesus and don’t judge.”

Photo by Mathieu Plourde from Flickr

Editorial by Andre Ascalon

On any given day, we are bombarded with information from a multitude of sources—email, text messages, television and social media sites. Sadly, too many times this barrage of information is more negative than positive. Between the increasingly common natural disasters, mass shootings, sexual misconduct of those in public office, the opioid epidemic, accidents and disturbing social and political issues, it seems like every day is a struggle to survive. Even for the most committed Christian, it can be a challenge to remain hopeful in a world that seems hopeless. But the good news is that we can.

Photo of David Franklin at NAD's eHuddle 2018 by Pieter Damsteegt

Story by V. Michelle Bernard / Photo by Pieter Damsteegt, NAD Communication

This week church leaders, local pastors and institutional leaders from across the Seventh-day Adventist church in North America gathered to discuss ways to collaborate to reach, retain and reclaim the people of North America with Jesus’ message and mission.

Topics covered included church revitalization, the trend of aging churches, ministering to large people groups (such as single mothers and their families) and how to reach missing Adventist members.

Pastor Steven Rantung prays with members grappling with immigration issues

Story By Celeste Ryan Blyden / Photos by Brian Patrick Tagalog

Members of two Indonesian Seventh-day Adventist churches in northern New Jersey are experiencing the effects of ramped up U.S. immigration reform firsthand. Dozens have been deported, voluntarily returned to their homeland or are “hiding” in the U.S.