Potomac Conference

Story by Daniel Granderson / Image by Mars P on Flickr

The four pillars of STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics—already shape nearly every aspect of our lives, and Adventist educational leaders, if interested in staying relevant in a business-minded world, must embrace its effects. It’s becoming clear that American business leaders of tomorrow are the STEM students of today.

Story by Edwin Manuel Garcia

The worldwide refugee crisis is prompting the United States to open its immigration doors to a larger number of people from regions in turmoil. According to the United States Department of State, nearly 70,000 refugees came to the U.S. last year—the world’s top resettlement location—yet recent political instability in Asia, Central America, the Middle East and Africa will boost admissions to 85,000 this year and 100,000 in 2017.

This dramatic increase will undoubtedly enhance the chances that families fleeing persecution may move into our communities in the near future. How should Seventh-day Adventists respond when refugees from Syria, Burma, Iraq, Honduras, Guatemala and other nations become our neighbors?

Jerrod and Jennifer Gabel

The Potomac Conference released the following statement today:


Potomac Conference Team:

After prayerful consideration, Jerrod and Jennifer Gabel, directors of Camp Blue Ridge (Montebello, Va.) have decided to return to Washington State to work on his family’s long-standing farm. The farm has encountered significant challenges over the years and they feel a strong calling to return and support the family in this time of need. Their last day with the Potomac Conference will be Feb. 29.

Takoma Academy’s desire to have a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) program that rivals those of the top tier schools in the nation took a huge leap forward with its recent acquisition of a 3-D printer.

Shaun Robinson, science teacher and robotics club advisor, says, “3-D printing is one of the areas that we are focusing on for the 2015-16 school year. It is a rapidly advancing technology that crosses many disciplines. Students in the best institutions are increasing their design and engineering skills with curriculum built around 3-D printing.”

The Seventh-day Adventist mission team enjoys visiting Cuba (Noah Simpson is not pictured.)

Although Seventh-day Adventists were unable to worship openly in Cuba until recently, members from Potomac Conference’s Seabrook church in Lanham, Md., have ministered there for more than three years. And this summer, Seabrook church members Gavin Simpson, Noah Simpson and Audrey Clarke traveled with Margaret Cancelliere, a member from Pennsylvania Conference’s Pottstown church, and Kenton Rawlins, a member from Connecticut, for a third mission trip to Gibara, a small seaside town where they have worked for the past two years.

Story by Dawna-gene Milton and V. Michelle Bernard