Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 145,000 members worship in 800 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences, two healthcare networks, 81 elementary and secondary schools, a liberal arts university, a health sciences college, a dozen community services centers, six book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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Story by ACSGW Staff
 
Adventist Community Services of Greater Washington (ACSGW)  is one of 24 regional charities recently recognized in The Washingtonian magazine's "Doing Good" feature that recommends area nonprofits to support with holiday season giving.
 
The Washingtonian recognized ACSGW for its work providing local residents necessities such as food and clothing, as well as technology education and job training.
 
More than 400,000 read The Washingtonian monthly, and Washingtonian.com reaches more than one million unique readers each month. 
 
Photo by Himsan on Pixabay

Story by Michele Joseph

You don’t need any special gifts or abilities,” says Tamyra Horst, Prayer Ministries coordinator for the Pennsylvania Conference, on being a prayer warrior. “You just need a willingness, an honest heart and a tenacity to not give up.” Here are a few tips from Horst and other prayer warriors in the Columbia Union.

Make God first: You’ve got to remove self. If God’s not first, who is?—Saundra Austin

Pray Scripture: Claim God’s Word; pray it back to Him.—Tamyra Horst

Give fasting a chance: It deepens the prayer experience.—TH

Richard Klinedinst by York Daily Record

Story by Michele Joseph

Richard Klinedinst could not sit at home in retirement. In 2010 he started walking. 

The 88-year-old member of Pennsylvania Conference’s York church says he was inspired by Ron Halversen Sr.’s book Prayer Warriors. He began prayer walking in his York neighborhood and then expanded across the city. Up until 2016, he walked one-and-a-half to two-and-a-half hours each day, and logged more than 1,000 miles. Last year he fell and discontinued his daily walks. But he continues to pray. Using index cards to divide the town into 90 sections, he prays for several neighborhoods each day.