Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 140,000 members worship in 843 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences; two healthcare networks; 100 early childhood, elementary and secondary schools; a liberal arts university; a health sciences college; a dozen community services centers; 5 book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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A MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT DAVE WEIGLEY

We are living through an unprecedented time, and while we are not immune to the impact of the coronavirus, we know that we serve an almighty God who sees, who cares and who is an ever-present help in times of trouble. As we journey this crisis together, we are in contact with the leaders of our conferences and institutions, and we are united in our commitment to do all we can to reduce the spread of the virus and help people in our communities. Please join us in praying for an end to COVID-19, and for the health care givers, first responders and other frontline workers who are working tirelessly to save lives.

At this time, our office remains closed to the public, until further notice. Please reach out to members of our administrative and ministry teams, and we will respond as quickly as possible.

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President Dave Weigley
Columbia Union President Dave Weigley and other leaders pray over Bibles that were sent around the union.

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

Yesterday, pastors and Hispanic Ministries coordinators gathered at the Columbia Union Conference headquarters in Columbia, Md., to pray over and take home (in total) more than 13,600 Bibles and 100,000 Steps to Christ in English and Spanish.

“We pray a special blessing on all these Bibles,” said Dave Weigley, Columbia Union president at the event. “As [the Bibles] go forth, may they be a wonderful light so many people might know Jesus Christ as their personal Savior and prepare for the great, soon coming of Christ.”

Kettering College’s Advanced Imaging program

Story by Lauren Brooks

From detecting the early stages of cancer to diagnosing COVID-19 and pneumonia, advanced imaging techniques are playing a critical role in the future of health care. To meet the growing demand for skilled technologists, Kettering College’s Advanced Imaging program is utilizing simulator software that gives students hands-on experience with today’s medical imaging technology.

Glenn Dale Spanish, Chesapeake Conference

Story by Andre Hastick

Recently, Chesapeake Conference's Glenn Dale Spanish group in Lanham, Md., officially transitioned to company status. During a special service, the group prayed and worshipped together to commemorate the occasion. Jerry Lutz, conference president, delivered a sermon to the congregation, emphasizing the importance of continued mission and outreach in the church community.

“I have been working with Glenn Dale for one year now, but we have been limited by COVID-19,” says Luis Humberto Orjuela, pastor of the Glenn Dale, Bowie, Laurel and Washington-Spencerville Spanish congregations. “The hard work was done by the Holy Spirit and the teamwork of the members, and we praise the Lord for what has been accomplished.”

Ndubuisi Nwade, Thomas Quinlan, Columbus chief police, C. Shaun Arthur, and Keith Goodman

Story by Benia Jennings

Three pastors from the Central Ohio region of the Allegheny West Conference (AWC) recently met with Columbus Police Chief Thomas Quinlan. The meeting, organized by C. Shaun Arthur, pastor of the Beacon of Hope church in Columbus, centered on discussing newly instituted police reforms, in light of the shootings of Andre Hill and Casey Goodson Jr. by local law enforcement. Keith Goodman, senior pastor of the Ephesus church in Columbus, and Ndubuisi Nwade, associate pastor at Ephesus, also joined the meeting.

Perspectives by Miya Kim

Over the past few years, I have been going on an identity journey. This journey has been revelatory in many ways. Very little is known about my origins and beginning. I know I was born in Korea and was in an orphanage in Incheon by the time I was 21 months old. There isn’t a trace of who my birth parents are, but a couple who hailed from the giant state of Texas came into the picture who wanted children but found it impossible to build a family traditionally.